Opinion & Commentary

Opinion: Cooper knows best, so who are we to question him?

September 18, 2020

by John Trump Maybe I’m just too dumb to get it.  All that science and data. Stupid me, thinking I could think for myself. At one point in my life, not that long ago, really, I thought I was pretty smart. Well, smarter than average, anyway.  What a fool, I was … am.  Just plain stupid. That’s me.  Thank you, Gov. Roy Cooper, for revealing my ignorance. For offering evidence of why you, and so many others like you, are so much smarter than me. You talk and they listen. You give orders and they follow. Instead, I questioned your…

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Opinion: The left’s long war on the Constitution

September 18, 2020

by Jon Guze The United States was founded on the principle that government exists to protect the natural rights of the governed, including, especially, the natural right to liberty. The Declaration of Independence says so explicitly. The Constitution — signed 233 years ago today (on Constitution Day) — is clearly an attempt to give practical expression to that principle. The Constitution is replete with provisions designed to limit governmental power and protect citizens’ rights. It is predicated on the presumption of liberty to such an extent that it is impossible to make coherent sense of the document as a whole…

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Opinion: Cooper faces test on voter ID

September 16, 2020

by John Hood I have repeatedly criticized Roy Cooper’s troubling efforts to amass power in the governor’s office at the expense of other elected state leaders, local governments, and private citizens. I have related the history of Cooper’s conflict with the General Assembly. I have conceded that state lawmakers struck first by encroaching on his powers shortly after his election in 2016 but that Cooper has gone far beyond trying to restore the separation of powers and now seeks gubernatorial supremacy. I have argued that the governor’s tactics — including budgetary brinksmanship, constant litigation, and brazen violations of the rule…

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Opinion: State Reserves May Not Be Enough

September 16, 2020

by John Hood RALEIGH — North Carolina’s state government began its 2020-21 fiscal year with $1.5 billion in cash left over from last year plus another $1.8 billion in rainy-day funds and other earmarked reserves. Since then, the state has collected some $1.5 billion more in General Fund revenue than it has yet spent. That’s a lot of money. Will it be enough to cover North Carolina’s expected budget deficits? At the moment, it’s impossible to say. Back in May, the legislature’s fiscal staff and Gov. Roy Cooper’s budget office produced a consensus forecast that predicted the state would collect…

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Opinion: Cooper’s post-COVID-19 plans should worry all North Carolinians

September 14, 2020

by Becki Gray Gov. Roy Cooper owns this. He owns the coronavirus response and everything that will follow.   Cooper has refused to confer with the Council of State, vetoed the General Assembly’s efforts to get businesses safely opened and people back to work, relied solely on his administration’s data and science, blamed President Trump and the republican General Assembly when convenient, and taken credit when it fit his political agenda. His decisions over the past few months will define his leadership and leave North Carolina with lasting marks. North Carolina will be worse off if he continues to get his…

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Column: Reflecting on 9/11 and my trip to New York City in October of 2001

September 11, 2020

by Frank Williams Today marks 19 years since the tragic terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.  Like you, I will never forget that day.  Like you, I pray that our nation will never again face such an attack.  We must remain vigilant. Below is an article I wrote on October 11, 2001, shortly after returning from a trip to New York City following the 9/11 attacks.  The article is entitled An Unimaginable Experience in New York City.  I hope you will take a few minutes to read it and join me in reflecting on 9/11 and the impact it has…

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Opinion – Without live shows, artists seeking ways to reach fans

September 10, 2020

By John Trump, Carolina Journal News Service RALEIGH — Will Easter is a promising North Carolina musician. A career just starting to take off. I reached him on his cell phone, and he wanted to talk.  A bit busy now, though, he said. Hanging drywall. “I actually took a job in construction to make money outside of music,” he told me.  Money to, well, pay the bills.  Just trying to get by. It’s a common theme for musicians these days.  The big acts, mega stars like Tim McGraw, can schedule online shows, and people are excited to pay good money to…

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Opinion – Bring Young Kids Back to School

September 10, 2020

By JOHN HOOD RALEIGH — Most North Carolina schoolchildren began this academic year trying to learn from home rather than at school. How’s it going so far? Set aside the blame game and partisan theatrics surrounding the issue, and simply ask parents and kids about their experiences. You’ll get mostly frowns, grimaces, complaints, even tears. Although there are certainly exceptions — children particularly well-suited to online learning, technically savvy parents who are superb educators in their own right — most will tell you that their 2020-21 school year is off to a poor and frustrating start. North Carolina’s leaders cannot…

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Todd

Opinion – We can help our state’s students with continued higher education reform

September 10, 2020

SENATOR TODD JOHNSON 55TH DISTRICT  Through my work as a member of the North Carolina Senate Education and Higher Education Committee and the Appropriations on Education/Higher Education Committee, I am committed to help our state’s postsecondary students complete their programs of study and begin their professional lives not unduly burdened with insurmountable debt. All of these things are even more challenging amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.  We are doing what we can at the state level to ensure our students are set up for success when they pursue a postsecondary degree. But more can be done at the federal level to…

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Opinion: Former Slave Blazed Trail for Writers

September 7, 2020

by John Hood You surely recognize the name Frederick Douglass and know the major role he played in American history after escaping his enslavement in Maryland in 1838. You may even know that the publication of his memoir — Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave — was a turning point in American letters. But do you recognize the name Harriet Jacobs? She also emancipated herself through acts of courage and determination. She also wrote a widely read memoir of her enslavement and liberation. And she was a North Carolinian, one of the many of our state’s…

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